“Adrienne gave me wonderfully fresh ideas for marketing my business at a big conference last Fall. They worked! I got two big clients from it!”

Janell Osborn White Space Graphics,LLC

  
×

Error

Strange, but missing GJFields library for /var/www/vhosts/azobleassoc.com/azobleassoc.com/plugins/content/autoreadmore/autoreadmore.php
The library should be installed together with the extension... Anyway, reinstall it: GJFields

Marketing Magician

Helping executives and business owners sell more in less time by revealing tips and suggestions on how to make the most of your marketing dollars.

  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Categories
    Categories Displays a list of categories from this blog.
  • Tags
    Tags Displays a list of tags that have been used in the blog.
  • Bloggers
    Bloggers Search for your favorite blogger from this site.
  • Team Blogs
    Team Blogs Find your favorite team blogs here.
  • Login
    Login Login form

The Changing of the Guard

by in Business Marketing
  • Font size: Larger Smaller
  • Hits: 2110
  • Subscribe to this entry
  • Print
2110
The Changing of the Guard

What a minefield this is, exacerbated by people not knowing how to handle the situation.

You have a seasoned salesperson who’s been calling on a client for three years.  You bring in a new salesperson and turn this seasoned client over to him or her.  The new salesperson calls the client to introduce him or herself, perhaps even sets an appointment.

And, of course this new person blabs that he or she is new, because you didn’t warn, “don’t go there.”  (There’s absolutely no reason to burden people with information they don’t need to know.  The length of time an individual has been with a company is a very poor second to their experience and expertise.)

Within a few weeks you receive a call from this client, who says he’s gotten a better deal elsewhere.  What’s going on here?  Pure emotion (remember: marketing isn’t logical; it’s emotional); but he’s definitely not going to give you the real reason, which is he’s ticked off at being handed over to the newest kid on the block.

 

You didn’t facilitate a smooth transition by setting an appointment and personally introducing your new salesperson.  You didn’t emphasize your new hire’s considerable sales experience, and you didn’t keep the irrelevant fact that he or she is new with your company under wraps.

No, I’m not asking you to lie and say this person’s been with you a long time, but “awhile” (if you’re even asked) could be three seconds!  If you told your client you were reassigning some of your people, would you be lying?  I don’t think so.  Isn’t that actually what you’re doing?

How to handle this touchy circumstance better?  

You might have set an appointment with the client and personally introduced the salesperson who has now been assigned to his account.  You might have assured your client that you would be consistently supporting the new assignee through the client’s learning curve.

Note:  people don’t take too well to change.  Do not sabotage your new salesperson’s chances, by accepting calls from the client (who doesn’t want to deal with his new representative) and/or countermanding what the salesperson said (particularly on price).  Support your staffer.  If he or she has done something wrong, communicate this privately.

Do not invite the client to call you whenever he has a question.  You thought you were assuaging the client, but now every time you turn around, guess who’s calling?  You’re trapped, and your new hire is really ticked off at not being supported.  Double whammy, because you thought you were being considerate.  Huh-uh.

The changing of the guard takes some finesse and patience, but the most important issue is not allowing the client to feel short-changed.  Your client deserves a continuation of the terrific service he’s always received from your people.  Moreover, he has to be reassured how important he and his business are to your firm (without getting sticky about it).

 


Need some help with your Marketing Plan? 

b2ap3_thumbnail_cover14-web.jpg   Visit www.azobleassoc.com for information on our “Do-able Marketing Plan” workbook and “10-Minute Marketing Plan” program.  

b2ap3_thumbnail_udemy.jpgYou may also visit Udemy.com to sign up for our recently-approved fourth course: “Over 100 Ways to Grow your Business.”

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_2015schmoozing-cover.jpg  And don’t forget to order our 2015 e-Schmoozing Calendar, just $17.95.  The Calendar will offer you 12 months of ideas of whom to invite for breakfast, lunch or coffee every week.  There’s a script that’s pertinent to one of each month’s schmoozing suggestions, to make those initial calls easier for you.  Our Schmoozing Calendar is a terrific bargain and a great way to embark upon face-to-face, immediately effective marketing!

 

0

Adrienne was a New Jersey public speaker and business expert for over THIRTY years. Now she’s a marketing and referral consultant. Denver and Northern Colorado have depended on her since her arrival here over 12 years ago.


Consulting and speaking to business owners and executives of growing businesses throughout the United States since 1977, Adrienne Zoble has guided companies toward marketing strategies that help them work smart, not hard.