“Adrienne gave me wonderfully fresh ideas for marketing my business at a big conference last Fall. They worked! I got two big clients from it!”

Janell Osborn White Space Graphics,LLC

  
×

Error

Strange, but missing GJFields library for /var/www/vhosts/azobleassoc.com/azobleassoc.com/plugins/content/autoreadmore/autoreadmore.php
The library should be installed together with the extension... Anyway, reinstall it: GJFields

Marketing Magician

Helping executives and business owners sell more in less time by revealing tips and suggestions on how to make the most of your marketing dollars.

  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Categories
    Categories Displays a list of categories from this blog.
  • Tags
    Tags Displays a list of tags that have been used in the blog.
  • Bloggers
    Bloggers Search for your favorite blogger from this site.
  • Team Blogs
    Team Blogs Find your favorite team blogs here.
  • Login
    Login Login form

Doing What You Say You’re Going To Do

by in Business Marketing
  • Font size: Larger Smaller
  • Hits: 2276
  • Subscribe to this entry
  • Print
2276
Doing What You Say You’re Going To Do

My Mother, who’s been gone for many years now, always used to proclaim, “Don’t give me any ‘luft’ invitations!”  “Luft” is Yiddish for “air” or “hot air.”  What Mother railed against was, “You’ll have to come over some time.”  Or, “We’ve got to get together.”

You get the idea.  

She wanted an invitation with a specific time and place, not some vague mention of a gathering that was destined not to occur.

Something similar happens in business, and it’s really annoying.  Often people don’t know how to end a phone call or an email, so they close with “I’ll get back to you tomorrow.”

They haven’t made any notation of this promise, because they have no intention of keeping it.  Yet they’ve been pretty clear.  They said “tomorrow.”

Poor marketing.  

 

What’s the purpose of making promises you have no intention of delivering?   You’re using empty words.  You’re potentially gaining a reputation for being unreliable.  How can this be to your advantage?

Be specific.  If you’re slammed, admit that it might be a week or so before you’ll be able to get back with a response.  Nobody’s going to scream, “It had better be tomorrow, or else!”  They’re busy, too; and they’ll respect your candor.

Over the years I’ve learned there’s another reason that people make vague, undeliverable promises; and it’s a tragic indictment on how we feel about ourselves:

We make these promises with no intention of following through, because it won’t matter.  No one will remember what we said.  We’re not important enough to be held accountable.  This lack of self-esteem does nothing for one’s marketing efforts.

Just say nothing.  It’s not necessary to fill every moment with words.  Silence can be golden.

Or, again, quoting my Mom, “It’s better to say nothing and let everybody think you’re dumb, than to say the wrong thing and let everybody know it!”

Some things never change:  Mothers know best. 


 

Need some help with your Marketing Plan?  

Visit www.azobleassoc.com for information on our “Do-able Marketing Plan” workbook and “10-Minute Marketing Plan” program.  You may also visit Udemy.com to sign up for our sessions on “Easy Market Planning” and “The Best Use of your Marketing Dollars.”

And don’t forget to order our 2015 e-Schmoozing Calendar, just $17.95.  The Calendar will offer you 12 months of ideas of whom to invite for breakfast, lunch or coffee every week.  There’s a script that’s pertinent to one of each month’s schmoozing suggestions, to make those initial calls easier for you.  Our Schmoozing Calendar is a terrific bargain and a great way to embark upon face-to-face, immediately effective marketing!

0

Adrienne was a New Jersey public speaker and business expert for over THIRTY years. Now she’s a marketing and referral consultant. Denver and Northern Colorado have depended on her since her arrival here over 12 years ago.


Consulting and speaking to business owners and executives of growing businesses throughout the United States since 1977, Adrienne Zoble has guided companies toward marketing strategies that help them work smart, not hard.